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March 17, 2016

Connected Car Technology Returns Home With Proud Parent

MARCH 10, 2016 Alumnus Nathan Kundtz returns to campus with a car demonstrating breakthrough satellite technology based on Duke metamaterials […]

MARCH 10, 2016

Alumnus Nathan Kundtz returns to campus with a car demonstrating breakthrough satellite technology based on Duke metamaterials research

By Ken Kingery

The future of mobile satellite communications recently rolled through the engineering quad on Duke’s campus. Dubbed the “mTenna,” the flat device is about the size of your hand and can connect with satellites in any direction while on the move, providing internet connections at speeds capable of handling a terabyte of data per month.

For anyone who has ever seen the giant satellite dishes controlled by heavy machinery perched atop large boats, the upside of the sleek new technology is immediately obvious. But besides maritime applications, the mTenna could also provide much faster internet connections to airplane passengers—or passengers in your own back seat.

The latter is how the prototype device made its way to campus—in the roof of a Toyota Highlander, as the so-called “connected car” made its way across the country on a publicity tour. The stop also brought the technology’s inventor back to the place where it all started.

Alumnus Nathan Kundtz returns to campus with a car demonstrating breakthrough satellite technology based on Duke metamaterials research

Nathan Kundtz (left) talks with David Smith (right) with George Truskey looking on

Nathan Kundtz, founder and CEO of Kymeta, the company producing the mTenna, developed the technology while completing his doctorate in the laboratory of metamaterials pioneer David Smith, professor and chair of the electrical and computer engineering department at Duke. (Smith is now a strategic advisor to Kymeta.)

Metamaterials are the combination of natural materials in repeating patterns to achieve unnatural properties. They are also what allow the mTenna to obtain signal from any direction without reorienting the device itself and to send and receive data simultaneously.

“What we’re doing isn’t terribly ambitious—we’re just looking to revolutionize wireless communications,” joked Kundtz at the start of his talk. “If you’ve seen the movie “The Martian,” there’s a scene where Matt Damon is hit by a huge satellite dish during a wind storm. Clearly we have a different view of the future.”

Read the full Duke University article

About Kymeta

The world’s demand for ubiquitous mobile connectivity is irrefutable. A global, mobile network is the answer to connecting people and places that have never been connected before.

Kymeta is making seamless, always-connected mobile communications possible with a unique hybrid approach that enables satellite and cellular networks to deliver a single, global, mobile network. End-to-end mobile communications are delivered with Kymeta K?LO™ connectivity services, and the world’s first and only electronically-steered, flat-panel satellite terminal that goes places traditional satellite dishes cannot. Backed by U.S. and international patents and licenses, the Kymeta KyWay™ terminal makes high-throughput, mobile communications possible in cars, trains, buses, trucks, boats, and much more.

If it moves, Kymeta keeps it connected.

For more information, visit kymetacorp.com and KALO.net.

Business Inquiries for Kymeta
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